Commentary: New Brunswick’s unchecked timber industries have left our forests in ruin and our people without land

Harrison Dressler’s latest article in the NB Media Co-op tells the story of Babalu Eye Anu Shabazz and his father and their struggle to foster ecological diversity in rural New Brunswick. Here’s a quote:

“Before 2001, you could mill all your own wood and build your own house,” Baba Shabazz explained. “Now, all of a sudden, in New Brunswick, people can’t afford to stay on their own land – which is a continuation of the legacy of Canada. You see this theme being repeated. People try to steward their own land. They’re used to create resources, and later they’re pushed off so that someone else can eat off of that.”

Read the full story HERE. Harrison is a researcher and writer working out of the Human Environments Workshop (HEW) funded by RAVEN.

Post office closure plan for Deer Island opposed by leaders

“Community leaders on Deer Island want Canada Post to reverse its decision to close the Leonardville Post Office. The federal Crown corporation plans to permanently close the post office this summer and replace it with outdoor community mail boxes. This would leave the island with one other postal outlet five kilometres away in Richardson’s Grocery at Lord’s Cove.”

Read the full story by Derwin Gowan HERE.

Fate of internationally educated nurses in post-pandemic New Brunswick uncertain

“Nurses were the arrowheads in the fight against COVID-19 in New Brunswick. They were (and are) the province’s first and most important line of defense. They were (and are) victims of the virus. The virus has taken a toll. By April 2022, nearly 700 nurses, many needing medical care, had been out of work at some point because of being infected with COVID-19.”

Read the full article HERE, in the NB Media Co-op, written by Faith Timipere Allison. Faith is a doctoral student at the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of New Brunswick working out of the Human Environments Workshop (HEW) funded by RAVEN.

New Brunswick’s media coverage of small modular nuclear reactors silences Indigenous perspectives

In stories about SMRs, corporate media–reporters, journalists, and editors in New Brunswick’s mainstream English-language press–have almost totally ignored Indigenous perspectives.

Read the full article HERE in the NB Media Co-op.

Harrison Dressler is a researcher and writer working out of the Human Environments Workshop (HEW) funded by RAVEN.

Bird habitats are being destroyed. It’s time for a change

“At its best, the Acadian forest, with its mix of softwood and hardwoods, makes a home for diverse plant and wildlife communities, including lynx, moose, deer, flying squirrels, and many, many species of birds, even though only a tiny fraction of the original Acadian forest remains. As our forests have been degraded, so have the habitats for the birds that find a home there.”

Read the full article HERE by Christine Jean, working out of the Human Environments Workshop (HEW) funded by RAVEN.

Time to rethink the common burdock, a ‘nuisance’ plant that’s actually a viable food option

As food prices rise, we may need to assess the way we look at our food. This includes looking into alternative, viable food options. Burdock, normally seen as a nuisance by the common gardener or landscaper, is a surprisingly versatile plant. It’s astonishing to most that it is a completely edible plant.

By understanding the growing cycle of the plant and what parts are most choice and when, burdock can easily find its way on to your dinner table.

Read the article HERE by Dallas Tomah in the NB Media Co-op. Dallas is currently working out of the Human Environments Workshop funded by RAVEN.

Indigenous groups challenge New Brunswick’s costly radioactive waste legacy

“The recent re-licencing hearing for New Brunswick’s Point Lepreau nuclear reactor highlighted the difficulty and cost of managing the province’s long-lived legacy of radioactive waste.

“Most of the radioactive materials generated by the Lepreau nuclear facility were never found in nature before the discovery of nuclear fission 83 years ago.

“The Point Lepreau facility, however, has produced – and will continue to produce – thousands of tons of these toxic radioactive materials in the form of high, intermediate and low-level radioactive waste which must be kept isolated from all living things for a period of time that dwarfs the span of recorded human history.”

Read the full article HERE, published by the NB Media Co-op, by RAVEN’s Kim Reeder and Susan O’Donnell.

New Brunswick’s environmental champions recognized on Earth Day

RAVEN is an associate. member of the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN). On Earth day (April 22), the NBEN celebrated key environmental champions with its annual NBEN awards. The award winners were chosen from nominations submitted by the more than 110 NBEN member and associate groups. RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell wrote the story for the NB Media Co-op. You can read it HERE.

Engaging the media to advance the rights of people with disabilities: webinar

On April 12 @5:30pm Atlantic, Kaitlyn Layden, with the New Brunswick Coalition of Persons with Disabilties, will speak about engaging the media to advance the rights of people with disabilities. Register here:  https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErdOCpqDoqH9CYmTb7IyqXUBUK2mV7HubY

This is the final event in the Human Rights & the Media Lecture Series organized by Tracy Glynn, with partners the Atlantic Human Rights Centre, St. Thomas University’s Department of Human Rights and Department of Journalism and Communications, the NB Media Co-op and RAVEN.

RAVEN intervention for the Point Lepreau hearing

NB Power has applied for a 25-year renewal of its licence to operate the nuclear reactor at Point Lepreau. Their current 5-year licence expires in June. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) will be holding a hearing to discuss the licence application on May 10, 11, 12, currently scheduled to be in-person in Saint John.

The RAVEN project submitted an intervention to the CRTC that you can read, HERE.

Land ‘buy back’ at Whaelghinbran Farm is protecting the Acadian forest

In New Brunswick, we don’t just need access to land for today, we need access to land for future generations, writes Amy Floyd, in one of her last articles for RAVEN published in the NB Media Co-op.

The owners of Whaelghinbran Farm near Penobsquis) found a creative solution to this challenge through an arrangement with the New Brunswick Community Land Trust. Read Amy’s article HERE.

New report: The future of Point Lepreau: Option B

The RAVEN project is pleased to launch its new report, The Future of Point Lepreau: Option B.

Our report considers climate justice, respecting Indigenous visions, and valuing the expertise of the environmental community. Option B is a response to the concurrent and interlinked energy, climate, social and economic equity crises we are all experiencing.

Download the report or read the NB Media Co-op story, HERE.

Webinar: More nuclear reactors for New Brunswick?

RAVEN lead investigator Susan O’Donnell has updated her award-winning presentation: More nuclear reactors for New Brunswick? and will be presenting it as part of the Tantramar Climate Change Week. Everyone welcome!

Tuesday, Feb. 8 @ 7pm. Register here for the zoom event:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMtceGvqD0qHt3Et2eEGjCSQPba3lMI0EkL

There are many more free events that week. Click HERE for the full schedule and links to sign up for each event.

Point Lepreau and more nuclear reactors in the news… again

For the past two years, the RAVEN project has been tracking the nuclear developments at Point Lepreau on the Bay of Fundy, in a rural area of the province. We have two new stories on the topic:

RAVEN’s Kim Reeder writes in the NB Media Co-op about the ongoing hearings by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, following the application by NB Power to renew its licence for the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station for another 25 years, plus the hearings by the provincial legislature’s Climate Change and Environmental Stewardship Committee. Article HERE.

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell teamed up with nuclear expert Dr. Gordon Edwards to analyze the current situation of the so-called small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) for New Brunswick. Their article: “New nuclear plants (SMRs) in New Brunswick: Wild card or sure bet?” was published by the NB Media Co-op, HERE.

Constitutional right to food… in New Brunswick?

RAVEN’s Amy Floyd wrote another informative article, published by our partner the NB Media Co-op: “Maine is the first U.S state to gain a constitutional right to food – Where is New Brunswick on this issue?” You can access the article HERE.

In November, voters in Maine approved a constitutional amendment establishing Mainers’ Right to Food. In her article, Amy analyzes the situation.

Human Rights & the Media lecture series

This winter, RAVEN is co-hosting the Human Rights & the Media Lecture Series, with partners the Atlantic Human Rights Centre, St. Thomas University’s Department of Human Rights and Department of Journalism and Communications, the NB Media Co-op and RAVEN. More information on all these events will be added as available. The dates are confirmed.

January 18, 5:30pm – Webinar. Nora Loreto, writer and editor of the Canadian Association of Labour Media (CALM), will be kicking off the first lecture in the series, speaking on her new book, Spin Doctors: How Media and Politicians Misdiagnosed the COVID-19 Pandemic. Register here: 

https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErdOCpqDoqH9CYmTb7IyqXUBUK2mV7HubY

Click on the RAVEN events page for the series lineup.

Have your say about climate policy

Two opportunities to share your opinion about climate policy.

The deadline has been extended to January 21 for the federal consultation on Canada’s Climate Plan, launched in December by Environment and Climate Change Minister Guilbeault. It’s open to all Canadians. The direct link to the survey is HERE.

Online consultation on New Brunswick’s renewed climate change action plan will take place from Jan. 24 to Feb. 24. The GNB media release is HERE.

Update, Jan. 24. The link to the online consultation portal is HERE.

On Tuesday, Jan. 18, Dr. Louise Comeau from the Conservation Council of New Brunswick will be presenting CCNB’s intervention 10am. Tim Murphy will be presenting from the New Brunswick Environmental Network at 4:15pm.

Click HERE to view the Legislative calendar with links to the agenda and livestream.

Uranium and nuclear energy in New Brunswick and beyond

This post includes files related to the zoom panel event held on Dec. 10, 2021 with speakers Gordon Edwards, Lorraine Rekmans, Tracy Glynn.

The story about the event, published by the NB Media Co-op, is HERE.

Direct link to the video archive of the event on YouTube is HERE.

The original panel description is HERE

Lorraine Rekmans kindly permitted us to photocopy her co-edited book (out of print), This Is My Homeland: Stories of the effects of the nuclear industries by people of the Serpent River First Nation and the north shore of Lake Huron. You can download it HERE.

Tracy’s slides HERE.

Gordon’s slides HERE.

Gordon also supplied: an edited text based on the transcript of the presentation given on December 10, 2021. In particular, an additional paragraph has been interpolated to explain the origin of the Port Radium mine in the NWT.
Uranium the Shape Shifter, by Gordon Edwards 
www.ccnr.org/shape_shifter_2021.pdf

Questions answered in writing at the event HERE.

Eleven questions submitted by viewers were left unanswered at the end of the Uranium panel event. HERE are those questions, and Gordon Edwards’s answers, including his links to further documentation.

The file of the event chat is HERE.

More materials:

Gordon strongly recommends that everyone consult a 2014 Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility (CCNR) submission regarding a permanent moratorium on uranium exploration and mining in Quebec, HERE.

On the CCNR website, a list of links to Indigenous declarations on nuclear issues is HERE.

Lorraine found the link to the 1989 report published by the AECB, Childhood Leukaemia Around Canadian Nuclear Facilities Phase I, HERE.

All stories published by the NB Media Co-op tagged “nuclear” are HERE. This link includes all the stories about the new nuclear reactors proposed for New Brunswick.

Mining Watch Canada has an excellent set of resources coming from its 2019 conference: Turning down the heat: Can we mine our way out of the climate crisis? HERE.

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell featured in CHCO-TV program

RAVEN’s lead investigator, Dr. Susan O’Donnell, was featured in the CHCO-TV program Southwest Magazine. Susan did the interview at the studio in St. Andrews before participating in the book launch for Letters from the future New Brunswick. The interview discusses the book, the RAVEN project, and problems related to the media here, and related issues. Watch the interview HERE.

Video critical of new nuclear reactors for New Brunswick wins environmental journalism award

RAVEN lead investigator Susan O’Donnell won the annual Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism award for her video “More nuclear reactors (SMRs) for New Brunswick?” – read the article published by the NB Media Co-op, HERE.

You can also read the briefing paper Susan wrote with four other academic researchers that was discussed with the provincial Minister of Natural Resources and Energy Development, HERE.

Does the world need more electric vehicles? More Canada?

RAVEN collaborator Tracy Glynn published a thought-provoking article today in the NB Media Co-op. She begins by challenging a commentary in the Fredericton Daily Gleaner that advocates intensifying mining in Canada to meet the demand for the minerals required for electric vehicle batteries.

Tracy’s analysis continues with descriptions of the impacts of mining on communities in Canada and globally. Definitely worth a read, HERE.

Environmental groups call for action toward a sustainable New Brunswick

RAVEN and other environmental groups across New Brunswick issued a call for action today. The climate emergency requires radical improvements in our treaty relationship and our relationship with nature and the environment, the way we produce and consume energy and food, and our approach to education and health services and management of our forests, waters and coastlines.

RAVEN is a member of the New Brunswick Environmental Network that published Greenprint 2021 today. RAVEN supported the publication development and we’re pleased to promote it.

HERE is the link to Greenprint 2021: Towards a Sustainable New Brunswick.

Read the article published by the NB Media Co-op, HERE.

RAVEN’s book launched in St. Andrews

Letters from the Future, How New Brunswickers Confronted Climate Change and Redefined Progress, was launched online on November 1, and in person on November 20. Editors Daniel Tubb, Abram Lutes and Susan O’Donnell were in St. Andrews for the successful in-person launch at the beautiful Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre. The room was packed (COVID-distancing packed), and the authors speaking included the three author/editors plus Naomi Gullison, and Cynthia Howland and Art McKay from the Skutik Collective, followed by a lively discussion about the challenges for making change in happen New Brunswick. Thanks to RAVEN’s Kim Reeder for organizing and for being a member of the Skutik Collective.

Letters from the Future New Brunswick

Our new book is published! Letters from the Future: How New Brunswickers Confronted Climate Change and Redefined Progress features 37 authors from different backgrounds with many different ideas.

There’s info in the NB Media Co-op story about the book and where to buy or order it. Help us get the word out by sharing this info with your networks, including on your social media. The awesome book launch video link is also below.

Launch story, Letters from the Future New Brunswick: https://nbmediacoop.org/2021/11/01/29241/

Launch video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSTcn_IQHes&t=3s

The book is in bookstores now. We are also having an in-person book launch and discussion with the editors and local authors at the Sunbury Shores Arts and Nature Centre in St. Andrews on Saturday, Nov. 20 from 3 to 5pm. Everyone is welcome to join us there!

Registration open: panel and workshop on climate action

RAVEN, an associate member of the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN), will be active in the NBEN Eco-Confluence and AGA on Oct. 16 (by zoom). Register or find more info for the NBEN event HERE.

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell will moderate a panel on “Collective climate organizing in NB post-pandemic.”

Susan will co-lead a panel with Louise Comeau from the Conservation Council of New Brunswick: “A holistic approach to reducing carbon emissions in New Brunswick: electrification, the Atlantic Loop, coal-phase out, and why new nuclear is not a solution.”

Hope you can join us for this engaging NBEN event!

State of Rural Canada report: New Brunswick

Friend of RAVEN Tom Beckley (University of New Brunswick) wrote the New Brunswick chapter of the 2021 State of Rural Canada report. The report is published by the Canadian Rural Revitalization Foundation.

Tom writes: “My contention is that much of what is good about New Brunswick and resilient about this place and its people, is its high proportion of rural residents.”

You can read the New Brunswick chapter:
http://sorc.crrf.ca/nb2021/

Or the full report on Canada:
http://sorc.crrf.ca/fullreport2021/

Rally Sept. 24 – Climate Emergency: This is Not a Drill

Rally for a safe climate and equitable world! Stand in solidarity with people most affected by the climate crisis. Co-hosted by a broad coalition of groups including the RAVEN project.

Friday, September 24 @noon at the New Brunswick Legislature in Fredericton.

Optional: 10:30am meet at Conserver House, 180 St. John Street (near the Legislature) to make signs.

Hear from climate activists, Indigenous land defenders, youth, scientists, trade unionists, energy policy experts and elected representatives on what a just energy transition looks like for Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada and beyond.

“Not a drill”: Fredericton rally to call for climate justice

Extinction Rebellion New Brunswick and partner organizations, including environmental groups and labour unions, invite everyone to assemble at the New Brunswick Legislature in Fredericton on unceded Wolastoqiyik territory on September 24 at noon to demand that all levels of government take immediate and effective action on the climate emergency that respects climate justice.

Participants are asked to wear masks and stand six feet apart in a visual display of safety and solidarity with everyone around the world affected by climate change and the global pandemic.  

“Our Indigenous Elders have told us for decades that humans have lost their way by neglecting to uphold the original teachings on how to respect and live in balance with Mother Earth. Hence, we are presently in a state of emergency facing global climate disasters and it will only worsen if we as humans don’t stop the greed of corporations and colonial governments,” says Wolastoqewi Grand Chief spasaqsit possesom – Ron Tremblay. 

“Climate justice goes beyond advocating for renewable energy, recognizing that injustice is linked to social, economic, and political systems and that climate change has its roots in capitalism, colonialism, the patriarchy and other systems of oppression,” says Susan O’Donnell, one of the climate rally organizers and lead researcher with the RAVEN project at the University of New Brunswick. 

With New Brunswick refusing to close the Belledune coal plant in 2030 as part of Canada’s transition off coal, advocates for a just energy transition point to the need to include all affected workers and communities in climate solutions and future economic planning. 

“Now is the time to be talking about a just energy transition for workers in the fossil fuel and nuclear sectors and their communities in New Brunswick as well as in Colombia where NB Power has been sourcing coal from the Cerrejón coal mine since the 1990s. It’s not the time to keep yesterday’s fuel sources like coal and nuclear on the table,” said Tracy Glynn, one of the rally organizers and who has worked with Colombian coal miners and affected community members to tell their stories for more than a decade. 

“The coal burned in Belledune comes from Colombia where its extraction is linked to the forced displacement and starvation of Indigenous Wayuu and Afro-Colombian farmers and children and repression of coal miners and unionists. Climate justice is migrant justice. It’s reproductive justice. It’s housing justice,” says Glynn. 

Climate activists, Indigenous land defenders, youth, scientists, trade unionists, energy policy experts, and elected representatives will share their thoughts on what a just energy transition looks like for Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada and beyond. Ron Tremblay, the Wolastoq Grand Chief, David Coon, MLA for Fredericton South, Fredericton Mayor Kate Rogers, Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, and Danny Legere, President of the New Brunswick Federation of Labour are among the speakers.

This rally is supported by Extinction Rebellion New Brunswick, Council of Canadians Fredericton Chapter, Council of Canadians Saint John Chapter, Coalition for Responsible Energy Development in New Brunswick (CRED-NB), Conservation Council of New Brunswick, CUPE NB, Fredericton Club of the Communist Party of Canada, Leap4wards Saint John, New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance (NBASGA), New Brunswick Federation of Labour, NB Media Co-op, No One Is Illegal Fredericton, RAVEN, Reproductive Justice NB and Solidarité Fredericton.

Global Launch of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2021

Tuesday, Sept. 28, 11am to 1pm Atlantic

Link to join at start time:
https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/live-event/ezzsrhaf

Here’s the link to the report:
https://www.worldnuclearreport.org/World-Nuclear-Industry-Status-Report-2021-773.html

We’re pleased to announce that RAVEN at the University of New Brunswick and the Environment & Society Program at St. Thomas University are the Canadian co-hosts of the global launch of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report! The WNISR is an independent expert assessment of nuclear industry developments globally. 

What: Global Launch of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2021

Date: Tuesday, 28 September 2021

Time:11am – 1pm Atlantic

10h–12h Washington D.C. Time (EDT)

16h–18h Paris Time (CET)

Where: Virtual https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/live-event/ezzsrhaf

The event is hosted by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Washington D.C. co-hosted by the RAVEN project (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) at the University of New Brunswick, Canada, and the Environment & Society Program at St. Thomas University, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

We will have a diverse line-up of distinguished speakers:

Geoffrey Fettus (Lawyer, NRDC) – Introduction/Moderation 

Mycle Schneider (WNISR) – Global Overview

Tatsujiro Suzuki (Nagasaki University, former Vice-Chair of Japan Atomic Energy Commission) – Fukushima+10

Mariana Budjeryn (Harvard Kennedy School) – Chernobyl+35

M.V. Ramana (University of British Columbia) – SMRs

Ali Ahmad (Harvard Kennedy School) /Thibault Laconde (Consulting Engineer) – Nuclear Power and Climate Change Resilience

Mathilde Le Moal (Master in Global Crime) – Nuclear Power and Criminal Energy

Antony Froggatt (Chatham House) – Nuclear Power vs. Renewable Energy Deployment

In addition, we are planning an SMR-focused event hosted by the University of British Columbia in early October 2021.

Background: The annual World Nuclear Industry Status Report (WNISR) provides a comprehensive overview of nuclear power plant data, including information on operation, production and construction. The WNISR assesses the status of new-build programs in existing as well as in potential newcomer nuclear countries. The report also compares the development of nuclear power and renewable energy globally.

WNISR2021 contains several focus chapters, including a first assessment of Nuclear Power and Climate Change Resilience. A special Fukushima Status Report 10 Years After provides an overview of ongoing onsite/offsite challenges, health impacts, judicial decisions and cost estimates of the disaster. Chernobyl – 35 Years After the Disaster Began looks at advances in the cleanup and remaining challenges. For the first time, WNISR dedicates a chapter to the problem of Nuclear Power and Criminal Energy.

For more information and past reports, published annually since 2007 see: http://www.worldnuclearreport.org/

Party election platforms: Should new nuclear reactors be part of Canada’s climate action plan?

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell and collaborator Dr. Gordon Edwards in Montreal analyzed the election promises of the major parties. The parties have widely divergent plans for nuclear in climate action. Read the article here, published by RAVEN partner, the NB Media Co-op.

Rural and suburban voices to be heard in the local governance reform debate

RAVEN’s Kim Reeder writes again about the local governance reform process. This story was written after the release of a report by the New Brunswick Local Service District Association, a group Kim is supporting during the process. The Association’s report is: Blueprint for Rural and Suburban Governance. You can read Kim’s article here.

A missed opportunity for true collaboration in local governance reform

RAVEN’s Kim Reeder has been working with local advocates for rural local governance reform. She published a commentary today in the NB Media Co-op. Read it HERE.

For many New Brunswickers, local governance reform could have been an exciting and celebratory process. However, the government’s biased public surveys, multitudes of technological challenges, and mixed messaging have reinforced public distrust of the reform process.

Growing a Better Future Project Updates

Amy Floyd, Rural Food Security Policy Analyst

For more information on any of these activities: amypfloyd@gmail.com

Agricultural leases for small farmers

RAVEN is excited to announce that we are working with a legal firm in New Brunswick to adapt an agricultural lease for small farmers. The template will be available in Fall 2021 on the RAVEN site. The document will help small farmers prepare to lease agricultural land to start their own small farm. Stay tuned for details!

“Learn-to-Garden 2021” program for the Nashwaak Valley

In the fall of 2020 surveys went out to shoppers, farmers and home gardeners to get a better idea of projects that people were interested in. One idea that came up several times was engaging seniors as gardening mentors. There are several seniors in the community who have 20 – 50+ years of experience with growing produce, food preservation and raising animals. This seems like a great way to reduce isolation, build inter-generational relationships and teach food security skills. We can do it all with no overhead costs (save a bit of labour time from my position to coordinate)! If the project is successful this year, it would be quite easy for a volunteer to take it on in coming years. Registration began in January and will run until late March.

Community Orchard Regeneration project

There is a very old non-commercial orchard in our community that may contain heritage varieties of apples. The owner gives apples away and hosted our Nashwaak Community Growers group in October for a cider pressing. In return, a group of volunteers will visit the orchard in February and March to share with the hard work of pruning trees. There are over 200 trees and we expect to only get to a handful each year, but that is more than the owner can achieve while working and raising a family. Hopefully this model could be viable for other rural communities.

Expanding the Rural Nashwaak Business Directory

The business directory was started as a volunteer project in 2018. In 2020 it was added to the Nashwaak Community Growers website to allow online access. I put the listing on the site to promote local food vendors, but have had a good response from all kinds of businesses asking to be added. https://www.nashwaakcommunitygrowers.com/local-business-directory

Other Community Promotion

Many people are moving to N.B from Ontario and other provinces. This is our chance as a community to attract new people to area. We would particularly home to attract young people and families. At the end of December, myself and a volunteer met with the Village of Stanley Council to discuss methods of online community promotion. FB: Moving to New Brunswick: Welcome to the Nashwaak Valley.

Meetings on accessible, rural housing for seniors

On January 12 a mix of stakeholders, including the newly formed Upper Nashwaak Seniors Housing Association met on a call to talk about potential options for purpose-built, affordable, seniors housing in the Nashwaak Valley. This project is relative to food security, because the vision of many seniors in this community is to create housing spaces with gardens for food security and health. The housing will also likely have a cooperative/ communal feel to it while keep with individual units. Another call will be scheduled soon.

More news about NB’s plutonium plan

An article co-written by RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell was published today by the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. You can read it HERE.

The article focuses on a letter written by nine US non-proliferation experts concerned about Canada’s support for the plan by Moltex Energy to extract plutonium from the used nuclear fuel at Point Lepreau on the Bay of Fundy.

From an international perspective, the government grant to Moltex can be seen as Canada sending a signal—giving a green light to plutonium extraction and the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel.

The plans for new nuclear reactors in New Brunswick are delaying real climate action and do nothing to address the climate crisis.

Building food sovereignty in New Brunswick with a worker-owned cooperative

In June, RAVEN hosted a visit to Pleasant Ridge in unceded Mi’kma’ki territory (near the Village of Rogersville) to learn about agricultural cooperatives at la Ferme Terre Partagée Cooperative. The trip was organized by RAVEN’s Amy Floyd.

Amy’s article about the history of the farm and agricultural cooperatives is a must-read for anyone interested in food sovereignty in New Brunswick. You can read it HERE online published by our partner the NB Media Co-op.

RAVEN endorses CCNB letter opposing NB’s plan to delay ending coal power

RAVEN advocates for genuine climate action. Burning coal at Belledune to generate electricity has to stop by the federal deadline of 2030, but our provincial government is lobbying to extend that deadline. The Conservation Council of New Brunswick (CCNB) wrote to federal Environment Minister Wilkinson with concerns about New Brunswick’s proposed regulation Phasing Out of Coal-fired Electricity Generation – Climate Change Act. RAVEN was among the many groups endorsing the CCNB letter. Our concerns regard the use of equivalency agreements when Canada is promoting its commitment to phasing out coal-fired electricity by 2030 within the Powering Past Coal Alliance. Read the letter HERE.

Build your own rain garden

RAVEN’s Amy Floyd published her new article today in the NB Media Co-op: Build your own rain garden: Using nature’s elegant designs to clean up New Brunswick’s waterways. You can read it HERE.

Amy’s article explains why rain gardens are important and things to consider when deciding if you should build your own. Links to organizations that can provide further resources are also included. Have a look!

Winning the Race to the Bottom: New Brunswick Forestry in Historical Context

The video is now available of the Tertulia co-hosted by RAVEN featuring Bill Parenteau and Mark McLaughlin sharing their political economy and historical insights about how our forest came to be managed the way it has been in New Brunswick. You can view the video published by RAVEN partner, the NB Media Co-op, HERE.

New Brunswick Forestry in Historical Perspective

Tertulia – Winning the Race to the Bottom: New Brunswick Forestry in Historical Perspective

RAVEN is a partner on this event, organized by Tertulias.

With New Brunswick’s Standing Committee on Climate Change and Environmental Stewardship set to discuss glyphosate spraying of the forest, record breaking timber prices and a government unwilling to increase Crown timber royalty rates, environmental historians and Bill Parenteau and Mark McLaughlin will share insights of political economy and historical context to discuss how our forest came to be managed the way it has.

Wednesday, June 9 at 7:30pm (Atlantic time) on Zoom.

Bill Parenteau is a recently retired Professor of History at the University of New Brunswick. His published research is, broadly, on the political economy and environmental history of Atlantic Canada. Additionally, he is a frequent public commentator on forest industry issues and a participant in Indigenous treaty and land rights cases.
Mark McLaughlin is an Assistant Professor of History and Canadian Studies at the University of Maine. Dr. McLaughlin’s research has focused on forestry and natural resource management, particularly the notions of forests as contested spaces and the state as mediator between various user groups competing for access to public resources.

This talk is co-presented by Tertulias Fredericton, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, RAVEN and the NB Media Co-op.

Watch on Zoom here.
Watch on Facebook live here.Stay updated/spread the word on the Facebook event page.

What is a tertulia? A tertulia can be described as a kind of philosophy café where participants talk about big thinkers, artists and ideas. This winter and spring, Tertulias Fredericton has put together a series on activists and social movements that have shaped our lives and allowed us to imagine a better future.

Tertulias Fredericton is supported by the NB Media Co-op, publisher of videos of the Tertulia talks.

For more information, visit Tertulias Fredericton on Facebook or contact: fredericton.tertulia@gmail.com.

Your Nuclear Dream May Turn Nightmare

RAVEN researcher Susan O’Donnell was interviewed recently in two articles about the plans by the nuclear industry to add more nuclear reactors on the Point Lepreau site on the Bay of Fundy.

The most recent, published by The Tyee, was prompted after nine US experts in sent a letter to Prime Minister Trudeau about the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of the federal government’s support for the Moltex project in New Brunswick. You can read it here.

The second article, published by the National Observer, reported on the significant opposition that exists to the nuclear infrastructure development being pushed by the industry and funded by governments. You can read it here.

The nuclear projects proposed for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action and do nothing to address the climate crisis.

Invitation to the farm: Field trip June 19

The RAVEN Project invites you to join us for an afternoon on farm and in community to learn about how Farming Co-operatives can work in New Brunswick with La coopérative Ferme Terre Partagée in Rogersville, N.B. The field trip will be on June 19 and is limited to 15 people. Free.

People are becoming more and more concerned with food sovereignty and supporting their local economy. Co-operatives are a tool that small and mid-scale farms can use to lower costs, become more efficient, expand marketing range and offer a wider range of products to customers. Co-ops can also be set-up to mirror the ethics and values of their members.

This event is organized by Amy Floyd, 
For more information and to register:https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/field-trip-farm-co-operatives-with-la-cooperative-ferme-terre-partagee-tickets-150795169411

This event is organized by Amy Floyd:

Food Security Policy Analyst
The Raven Project (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) https://raven-research.org/

Founder and Administrator
Permaculture Atlantic Network
www.permacultureatlantic.com

Hampton High students support Wolastoq Grand Council resolution against nuclear development

The Climate Action Team at Hampton High School (HHS) are not only activists but also allies to Indigenous peoples. MLA Megan Mitton (Green Party, Memramcook-Tantramar) tabled a petition from HHS students in support of the Wolastoq Grand Council resolution against nuclear energy development and nuclear waste. Read the story in the NB Media Co-op, HERE.

The nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action because they do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Voices from New Brunswick’s Future: Call for Young Writers

Photo by Martin Spiske from Unsplash

The RAVEN project is calling upon young voices. This summer, we are starting a new Letters from New Brunswick’s future initiative, written and edited by young people in New Brunswick. The project managing editor is Kelly Green, a student and coordinator of the fossil fuel divestment campaign at St. Thomas University.

The year is 2040 and you are living in New Brunswick. In 2021, New Brunswickers understood that in order to avoid the irrevocable magnitude of what climate change can do to our planet, we needed to take urgent action to shift our current systems. Your community and province have finally taken these measures to get off fossil fuels and to adapt to a changing climate. How do you envision this green future for New Brunswick?

A report prepared by the IPCC in 2018 warned us of a twelve-year time span to change our way of life before the impacts of climate change become an irreversible reality. Although the impending crisis requires immediate action, it seems that everything is running business-as-usual. But what if we made the change? What if New Brunswick transformed to ensure a green future? What would that future look like, and how did we get there?

In 2019 and 2020, the RAVEN (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) project at the University of New Brunswick collected 20 “letters from the future” from New Brunswickers. People of all ages were invited to be a part of building a new narrative, a vision for a future New Brunswick in 2030, 2040, 2050, or later. The idea was inspired by the video Message from the Future, by US congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The original call for writers, written by RAVEN co-investigator Daniel Tubb and UNB student Abram Lutes, can be viewed here. They gathered letters from New Brunswickers to help shape a vision of what a green future would look like when adapted locally. Those letters were published online by RAVEN partner the NB Media Co-op and will be part of an edited book to be launched this Autumn.

Now we are starting a new Letters project, written by young authors. Other than thinking of our worst-case scenario, which tends to be the narrative when discussing the climate crisis, we want to hear how younger generations envision a progressive and prosperous move to a green future in New Brunswick. All published letters from the previous “Letters from New Brunswick’s Future” series can be viewed here; these included ideas such as low carbon mobility, unified local communities, conservation, and much more.

Letters from the future take a hypothetical look back to envision what New Brunswick could accomplish by 2030 onward if we change our habits, productions, and structures. Looking back from 2030 and beyond, how did New Brunswick respond to climate change? How did we overcome the challenges faced? What were our solutions? What initiatives did New Brunswick take to build a carbon-free province? These are all possible questions that could be addressed in the letters.

We are looking to publish around 20 letters written by authors from 13 to 25 years old. Writers should be from, studying, or residing in New Brunswick, with a plan to stay here for the foreseeable future.

Submissions of between 800 and 1,200 words will be accepted beginning June 1, 2021. Letters should be sent directly to Kelly Green at hmkxn@stu.ca. All accepted letters are subject to edits from RAVEN and the NB Media Co-op editorial board before being published by the NB Media Co-op online.

Authors of letters selected for publication by the NB Media Co-op will receive a $50 honorarium from RAVEN. We are looking forward to highlighting the visions of young voices.

Kelly Green,
RAVEN Research Assistant

Folk schools – Nimble solutions for grassroots education

RAVEN’s Amy Flood works on food security, community development and rural issues. In her latest article published by the NB Media Co-op, Amy discusses folk schools that are adapted to the local culture to create learning that fits lots of ages and backgrounds. You can read the article here.

Videos: Bay of Fundy – natural wonder or nuclear industry test site?

The RAVEN project and seven co-hosts organized two webinar panels, with presenters from Canada and the United States, on the theme: The Bay of Fundy: Natural Wonder or Nuclear Industry Test Site?

Access the videos published by the NB Media Co-op, here.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

‘Not in service’ – Province of New Brunswick’s response to many residents of unincorporated areas

RAVEN’s Kim Reeder is currently working on rural governance issues. Kim’s latest article published by the NB Media Co-op highlights a challenge faced by rural residents when attempting to find information about Local Service District governance.

Kim writes: “In many areas of the Province, when LSD residents aimed to answer the call to participate in LSD Advisory Committee elections or to have questions answered, they found that the emails, and in some cases even the phone numbers provided for contact were not in service.

“Whether by design or not, conditions such as these highlight the inequity of the rural condition and do not instill confidence that the Province can reliably host LSD elections. Unfortunately, that concern is compounded by the reality of unreliable internet service throughout many rural regions in the Province.

You can read the full article here.

40 ways to increase food sovereignty this season

“The simplest way to think about food sovereignty is to ask, do people have choice or control about the kind of food they eat? Having sovereignty means choosing to eat food from sources you want to support (like local farms), having access to nutrient dense food, having access to land if you want to grow your own food, and it means having food available that is culturally appropriate and honours our household food traditions.”

RAVEN’s Amy Floyd’s latest article for the NB Media Co-op is here.

Bill to ban glyphosate tabled by New Brunswick MP

This week MP Jenica Atwin (Fredericton) tabled a private members’ bill to ban the use of glyphosate in Canada.

In the video of her intervention, made from her Fredericton North constituency office, Atwin stated: “The widespread use of glyphosate over New Brunswick forests and across Canada is a menace to human health, and plant and wildlife diversity.”

Atwin’s bill builds on a growing global consensus against the use of the poisonous herbicide, following the International Agency for Research on Cancer finding that glyphosate is a probable carcinogen.

“Rather than allowing toxic chemicals to be sprayed in Canada until they are proven harmful, we should be exercising greater precaution: banning products until they can be deemed safe,” said the MP. “Canadians have the right to breathe clean air, drink safe water, and harvest healthy foods from the land.”

Read the full story in the NB Media Co-op, written by RAVEN lead investigator Susan O’Donnell.

Panel on Canada’s nuclear policy and SMRs

Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin invited RAVEN’s lead researcher Dr. Susan O’Donnell and Dr. Gordon Edwards, President of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, to a roundtable discussion by zoom on April 14. The topic was Canada’s Nuclear Policy and SMRs. You can watch the recording of the roundtable here:

https://www.facebook.com/GreenPartyofCanada/videos/934857067289154/

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action.

Caroline Ennis on the 1979 Tobique Women’s March [video]

Caroline Ennis, organizer of the 1979 Tobique Women’s March to Ottawa, delivered a talk on how she and other Wolastoqiyik women of Tobique First Nation organized to stop gender discrimination in the Indian Act on March 31. RAVEN co-hosted the talk, organized by Tertulias Fredericton. The video of the talk was published by RAVEN partner, the NB Media Co-op, here.

French presentation: More nuclear reactors for New Brunswick?

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell was invited by the group Imaginons la péninsule acadienne autrement to present at their Écofestival 2021 event in March. The topic was the nuclear reactor projects planned for New Brunswick. The video of her presentation and Q&A afterwards is here (French language).

The video of Susan’s English-language presentation to the New Brunswick Environmental Network in January is available here.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Who is minding the nuclear file?

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell continues her investigation with colleagues into the plans to develop experimental nuclear reactors beside the Bay of Fundy. In this article co-written with Gordon Edwards and published by RAVEN partner the NB Media Co-op, the lack of oversight into the proposed used fuel “recycling” plan is explored.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

CBC radio interviews by RAVEN


The day after federal taxpayer handed a $50.5 million gift to Moltex Energy to develop their design for a nuclear reactor on the Bay of Fundy, RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell was interviewed by the CBC morning radio programs in Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John. The first two were made available. Listen to the interviews below.

Fredericton – 6 minutes

Moncton – 10 minutes

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Rural governance needs local coordination and action now

RAVEN’s Kim Reeder published an article today about the need for a coordinated and strategic approach to rural governance. Kim notes that “The effort toward local governance reform has had a long, and mostly unsatisfying, history in the province.”

Her article focuses on the government’s current local government reform process and the new organization – the Union of Unincorporated Areas of New Brunswick (UUANB) – to give collective voice to Local Service Districts in the reform process underway.

You can read the article here, in the NB Media Co-op.

Briefing paper: The proposed nuclear reactors (SMRs) for New Brunswick

You can read or download the briefing paper on this page.

RAVEN became engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Briefing paper on more nuclear reactors for New Brunswick

The RAVEN project is supporting climate action. In our ongoing efforts to share information about the proposed “small modular nuclear reactors” for New Brunswick, we teamed up with nuclear experts and produced a briefing paper for the government, discussed at a meeting with Minister Mike Holland on February 24. You can read the briefing paper here.

Video: Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy in New Brunswick

Chris Rouse: Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy in New Brunswick: Why public investments are better than incentives.

Chris Rouse, the founder of New Clear Free Solutions, developed an Integrated Resource Plan for New Brunswick that achieves a 95% Renewable energy solution through public investments. In this video presentation, Chris discusses his IRP that offers the least cost sustainable solution to our environmental problems that benefits all New Brunswicker both now and in the future. The event was organized by the Coalition for Responsible Energy Development in New Brunswick (CRED-NB), Extinction Rebellion New Brunswick, and the RAVEN project (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) at the University of New Brunswick.

Video: A fresh food tax credit and food security for New Brunswick

A video of the presentation by University of New Brunswick and RAVEN Masters student Jessica Morehouse on her research on Fresh Food Tax Credits and Food Security in New Brunswick.

Background: Early in January 2020, the RAVEN project organized a meeting at the Greener Village food bank in Fredericton for local champions working on food security issues. The meeting ended with a request for RAVEN to support research to explore if a fresh food tax credit would work in New Brunswick. Four provinces already have a similar tax credit to support local food producers to donate to food banks. Could this work here? Watch the video:

$20 million for proposed nuclear reactor in NB

RAVEN lead investigator continues her interest in the proposed nuclear reactors for New Brunswick with another article published this month in RAVEN partner, the NB Media Co-op: New Brunswick gives a $20 million gift to our American nuclear company. Read Susan’s article here.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Webinar Feb. 23: Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy in New Brunswick

Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy in New Brunswick: Why public investments are better than incentivesFree event, everyone welcome. Register to receive the event link and a reminder:

https://unbvirtualclasses.zoom.us/…/tJwpdeGqqTsuE9S63pf…

Chris Rouse is the founder of New Clear Free Solutions and has been very active in the environmental movement for over 10 years. Chris has a very extensive technical background. He has developed an Integrated Resource Plan for New Brunswick that achieves a 95% Renewable energy solution through public investments. The IRP offers the least cost sustainable solution to our environmental problems that benefits all New Brunswicker both now and in the future.

This event is organized by the Coalition for Responsible Energy Development in New Brunswick (CRED-NB), Extinction Rebellion New Brunswick, and the RAVEN project (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) at the University of New Brunswick.

Webinar Feb 17: A Fresh Food Tax Credit and Food Security for New Brunswick

February 17 – Webinar presentation by Jess Morehouse: A Fresh Food Tax Credit and Food Security in New Brunswick.

Webinar: Fresh Food Tax Credits and Food Security in New Brunswick

University of New Brunswick and RAVEN Masters student Jessica Morehouse will present the results of her research on Fresh Food Tax Credits and Food Security in New Brunswick. The presentation is open to all. Jess will make a 15-minute presentation and then engage in discussion with participants.

Please join us! Registration is required:https://unbvirtualclasses.zoom.us/…/tJYtfu-tqzMqGtDuxc…

Background: Early in January 2020, the RAVEN project organized a meeting at the Greener Village food bank in Fredericton for local champions working on food security issues. The meeting ended with a request for RAVEN to support research to explore if a fresh food tax credit would work in New Brunswick. Four provinces already have a similar tax credit to support local food producers to donate to food banks. Could this work here?

Why was a book launch in 2018 with university partners investigated by police?

In October 2018, Joan Kuyek visited New Brunswick to launch her book on how to protect your community from the mining industry. The event was supported by the Department of Politics and International Relations at Mount Allison University, RAVEN (Rural Action and Voices for the Environment) at the University of New Brunswick, the Canada Research Chair in Global and International Studies at St. Thomas University, MiningWatch Canada, and the publisher, Between the Lines.

Prof. Dave Thomas at Mount Allison filed an information request to find out why the RCMP were present at the event. Read the story by RAVEN’s Tracy Glynn in the NB Media Co-op, here.

Video: More nuclear reactors for New Brunswick?

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell was invited by the New Brunswick Environmental Network to make a presentation about the proposed nuclear reactors for New Brunswick. The NB Media Co-op published the video, here.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Conversations on rural housing in New Brunswick

RAVEN’s Amy Floyd has been looking into housing options in rural New Brunswick, particularly for seniors. Read what she’s been finding out in her two stories for the NB Media Co-op:

Seniors open the door for conversations on accessible rural housing in New Brunswick

Accessible, multi-generational and intentional: Alternative housing models on the horizon in New Brunswick

More nuclear reactors for New Brunswick?

Join the webinar on Jan. 14, an online workshop: Calculating the risks and benefits of Small Nuclear Reactors (SMRs) in New Brunswick. RAVEN is co-hosting this event organized by the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN). NB Media Co-op is also co-hosting.

The NBEN online risks and benefits calculator is featured in this event. Participants are invited to use it to determine for themselves about the new nuclear reactors (SMRs) proposed for the province.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Student-led fossil fuel divestment campaigns continue

The students leading the fossil fuel divestment campaigns at UNB (Rose He) and STU (Kelly Green) published an article in RAVEN partner, the NB Media Co-op. Their article discussed the campaigns at all four major universities in the province.

You can read their article: Student-led fossil fuel divestment campaigns continue in New Brunswick through the pandemic, at this link.

David Bedford on the Marshall Decision Two Decades Later: Emancipation as Oppression [video]

RAVEN partnered with the NB Media Co-op and Tertulias for this webinar event about the Marshall Decision, a milestone in the legal history of Indigenous peoples and the state. In this video, former UNB prof David Bedford looks at the implications for First Nations in New Brunswick. The NB Media Co-op published the video here.

David Bush and Valerie Lannon on the Green New Deal and the socialist case against the carbon tax [video]

RAVEN continues its partnership with St. Thomas University’s Environmental Praxis course and the NB Media Co-op to bring you another interesting lecture. The video was published today by the NB Media Co-op. You can view it here.

David Bush is a Ph.D. student at York University, a labour organizer active with the Fight for $15, contributor to the Spring Magazine, and editor at Rankandfile.ca.

Valerie Lannon is one of the co-founders of the Spring Socialist Network. She supports climate justice and indigenous rights and is the co-author of Indigenous Sovereignty & Socialism.

Daniel Tubb on his book, Shifting Livelihoods: Gold Mining and Subsistence in the Chocó, Colombia [video]

RAVEN co-investigator Daniel Tubb recently published a book based on his research with subsistence gold miners in rural Columbia. In his webinar presentation, Daniel talks about his process of ethnographic research. RAVEN teamed up with the NB Media Co-op and Tertulias for this event. The video was published by the NB Media Co-op, here.

Federal government is suppressing dissent on nuclear energy

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell teamed up with Sam Arnold from the Sustainable Energy Group in Carleton County for a commentary in the Hill Times today. The topic is how environmental groups opposed to nuclear energy have been blocked from participating in government processes to make their views heard. You can read their article shared on the CRED-NB website.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

Fossil fuel divestment campaign continues at UNB

The UNB divestment campaign continuing in Autumn 2020, led by Rose He, RAVEN research assistant and first year electrical engineering student. RAVEN is also working with the fossil fuel divestment campaign at St. Thomas University, led by Environment & Society student Kelly Green.

For more information about the campaign or to sign the petition, check out our divestment page.

Bob Bancroft: Where have all the good forests gone? [video]

RAVEN, the NB Media Co-op and St. Thomas University’s Environmental Praxis Lecture Series continues its partnership. In this presentation, Bob Bancroft, a wildlife biologist and the president of Nature Nova Scotia, delivered the talk, “Where have all the good forests gone?”

RAVEN partner the NB Media Co-op published the video of his talk, here.

Sabine LeBel on Queer Environmental Futures [video]

RAVEN co-investigator Sabine LeBel presented this engaging talk on queer environmental futures, captured on video and published here by the NB Media Co-op. Sabine is an Assistant Professor in the Culture and Media Studies Department at the University of New Brunswick Fredericton. 

The talk was part of St. Thomas University’s Environmental Praxis Lecture Series.

Canada’s support for nuclear reactors and opposition in New Brunswick

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell represents the project in the Coalition for Responsible Energy Development in New Brunswick (CRED-NB). For the NB Media Co-op, Susan wrote an analysis of the federal throne speech and government support for new nuclear reactors. You can read her article here.

RAVEN is engaged in this issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.

RAVEN video contest winners!

The RAVEN project is pleased to announce the winners of our cell phone music video contest on the theme Growing a Better Future:

Youth – $500 prize

  • Grow it Yourself – Tess Green, East Brighton, NB
  • Seeds are for Sharing – Michael Daugherty with Rosie and Arthur, Knowlesville, NB

Adult – $1,000 prize

  • Notre Jardin – Our future – Melissa LeBlanc and Anna Vienneau, Nashwaak Bridge, NB
  • Planted – Ryleigh Hatch and Erin Sawden, Harvey, NB
  • Dig a Hole – Brendan Green, East Brighton, NB
  • Standing Tall – Eric D’s Allain, Moncton, NB

Runner-up – $500 prize

  • Food Creates Community – Adam Weaver, Scotch Lake, NB

You can view the winning videos here:
https://raven-research.org/ravens-2020-cell-phone-music-video-contest-winners/

Congratulations to all our contest winners!

Fredericton climate action rally has renewable energy, anti-nuclear message

Extinction Rebellion New Brunswick a rally in Fredericton on Sept. 25, the Global Day of Climate Action, outside the office of Premier Blaine Higgs. Protesters called on the government to transition rapidly to renewable energy and stop their plans to develop new nuclear reactors in the province. RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell wrote this story about the rally for the NB Media Co-op.

Mark McLaughlin on the rise of eco-comics and how the Maritime governments helped shaped environmental education [video]

RAVEN partnered with the NB Media Co-op and the Environmental Praxis lecture series at St. Thomas University on this talk by Dr. Mark McLaughlin. Mark discussed the history of using comics for environmental education and how comics were used in particular by Maritime governments in the 1970s to shape environmental education. The video of his talk was published by the NB Media Co-op. You can view it here.

“Coal is not progress, it is death”: Indigenous Wayuu woman

Indigenous Wayuu and Afro-Colombian communities have long been vocal against the forced displacement, environmental degradation, human rights abuses and increasing death toll caused by the Cerrejón coal mine in Colombia. NB Power sources coal from this mine.

RAVEN’s Environmental Action reporter Cortney MacDonnell prepared a video and wrote a story about it for the NB Media Co-op. You can read Cortney’s story here.

RAVEN students Fall 2020

RAVEN is pleased to have three new students working with the project this term:

  • Christine Jean is an Honours student in Anthropology and History at UNB. She is working with Kim Reeder and Susan O’Donnell on the sustainable energy development project.
  • Kelly Green is a STU student majoring in Environment & Society Studies and Communications & Public Policy with a minor in Sociology and Science & Technology Studies. Kelly is working with Janice Harvey and Rose He on the fossil fuel divestment project.
  • Rose He is in the first year Engineering program at UNB. Rose is working with Kelly Green and Susan O’Donnell on the fossil fuel divestment project.

Two new nuclear reactors for New Brunswick with no adequate policy on radioactive waste in place

RAVEN’s Susan O’Donnell teamed up with Gordon Edwards of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility to write this article in the Ottawa publication, the Hill Times. In their article, they discuss how the federal government is planning to fund new nuclear reactors for New Brunswick while the radioactive waste policy is inadequate. You can read their article here.

RAVEN is engaged in the nuclear issue because the nuclear projects planned for New Brunswick are delaying genuine climate action. They do nothing to address the climate crisis and divert resources and attention to the need to rapidly increase our reliance on renewable energy.